Press Coverage

January 30, 2018
by Jeff McMahon
Forbes

Zero-emission vehicles could become "as ubiquitous as smartphones" in California by 2040, according to the author of a report out today that analyzes the state's progress toward Gov. Jerry Brown's goals to transform the state's automobile stock.

In 2012, Brown called for 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles on California roads by 2025. On Thursday, he upped the ante to five million ZEVs by 2030. Just over 362,000 ZEVs have been sold in California so far, almost half of the nation's total, but it's the rate of those sales that analysts find telling.

January 30, 2018
by Ezra David Romero
Capital Public Radio

Even though there are only about 340,000 zero-emission vehicles in California today, the state is on par to reach its goal of 1.5 million by 2025.

This is according to a new report by the group Next 10. “The range of electric vehicles continues to go up and up,” said Noel Perry with the public policy think tank. “And the number of choices that consumers are finding in the showrooms is also going up.”

January 30, 2018
by Liam Dillon
L.A. Times

California is on pace to exceed its goal of 1.5 million electric cars on the streets by 2025, according to a new report from public policy think tank Next 10.

Nearly 350,000 electric vehicles have been sold in the state, and 2017’s growth rate in sales was almost 30% higher than 2016’s rate, the report found. Researchers credited reduced battery costs, lowering the overall price tag of the vehicles, and strong demand worldwide as key drivers of the increase in sales.

January 30, 2018
by Paul A. Eisenstein
The Detroit Bureau

Despite a slow start, California should be able to hit its ambitious goal of putting 1.5 million zero-emissions vehicles, or ZEVs, on the road by 2025, according to a new study.

August 31, 2017
by Gregor Macdonald
RouteFifty.com

For more than 50 years, California has reliably called on growth in gasoline tax revenues to offset the maintenance cost of its massive freeway and highway system. But what if those revenues eventually peak, and then, decline?

Later this fall, the Golden State’s next round of higher gas taxes and vehicles fees will begin a two year rollout. As part of Senate Bill 1, passed this April, total state petrol taxes will rise from the current .27 cents to .47 cents per gallon, creating a wave of new revenues between $4.7 and $5.66 billion per year, for the next 10 years.

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