Press Coverage

April 24, 2017
by Jeff Horseman
The Press-Enterprise

Money raised by raising the gas tax by 12 cents a gallon won’t be enough to fixing California’s crumbling roads, and a longer-term answer is needed, according to a report released Monday, April 24 by a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank.

Better fuel economy and the popularity of zero-emission vehicles make the gas tax an outmoded, unreliable funding source for transportation, states the report, “Beyond the Gas Tax: Funding California Transportation in the 21st Century,” put out by Next 10 in conjunction with Beacon Economics.

March 28, 2017
by Jeff Wattenhofer
Curbed Los Angeles

City planners in post-Measure S Los Angeles are beginning to work on updating LA’s 35 individual community plans, and the big question is how hard officials will push for increased housing density.

Density opponents may decry the so-called Manhattanization of their city, but there may be a new reason to support a taller, denser Los Angeles: Increased housing density might combat climate change, according to a new study by the think tank Next 10.

March 28, 2017
by Erik Anderson
KPBS

A pair of UC Berkeley researchers tried to gauge the impact of different housing development strategies on that state's desire to meet its goal to reduce global warming gas emissions.

The researchers considered city planning that allowed for sprawl, had some in-fill housing and focused planning efforts on increasing density in cities.

The research was funded by the nonpartisan think tank Next 10.

The study found densely developed communities reduced the need to drive and that put fewer greenhouse gasses into the air.

March 28, 2017
by Kevin Smith
Los Angeles Daily News

Encouraging new housing development of vacant or under-used properties would spur economic growth, reduce monthly household costs, cut greenhouse gas emissions and help California meets its climate goals, according to a report released today.

The “Right Type, Right Place” report was commissioned by Next 10 with research conducted by the Terner Center for Housing Innovation and the Center for Law, Energy and the Environment at UC Berkeley.

March 28, 2017
by Ben van der Meer
Sacramento Business Journal

California could go a long way to meeting its environmental goals in greenhouse gases — and see greater economic growth — by building more infill housing by 2030.

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